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Coronavirus manufacture and accreditations of ethanol hand sanitisers VS alcohol free sanitiser...

Coronavirus manufacture and accreditation of ethanol hand sanitisers vs alcohol free sanitiser… 

 

 

‘There are no specific BPR requirements for the grade of ethanol that can be used in biocidal products…this means companies can use the lowest quality, cheapest ethanol solutions for their hand sanitisers’

Manufacturers and suppliers of hand sanitisers must comply with the relevant laws. This may mean your product needs to be authorised by HSE. Check which regulations apply to your product

All hand cleaning and sanitising products (such as liquids, gels and soaps) are regulated in the UK. If you are manufacturing or importing hand sanitising products you must comply with whichever regulations are relevant for each product in your range.

Ethanol (CAS 64-17-5; EC 200-578-6) has been supported for assessment under the BPR (Biocidal Products Regulation) review programme for use in Product type 1 – human hygiene biocidal products (which would include hand sanitisers) and is still undergoing that assessment. This means you do not need a product authorisation or any specific derogation from HSE to bring an ethanol-based hand sanitiser to the UK market – that would only be required once the review of ethanol has been completed and it gains approval under BPR.

Although there are no specific BPR requirements for the grade of ethanol that can be used in such biocidal products, World Health Organisation (WHO) guidance on making hand sanitisers recommends that pharmacopoeia grade chemicals are used. The European Pharmacopoeia specification for ethanol allows for maximum amounts of common, potentially hazardous impurities. For example, methanol is identified as a potentially hazardous impurity that should not exceed 200 ppm (0.02%). The WHO guidance however, is a guide, not a legal require

Because there are no requirements for the grade of ethanol that can be used in biocidal products this means companies can use the lowest quality, cheapest ethanol solutions for their hand sanitisers. Links in well with dermatitis argument and long term absence of employees due to skin conditions which deter them from labour-intensive jobs such as construction for example.

GermzAway uses a chemical called chlorohexidine rather than ethanol, and so we have a list of British Standard Accreditations to show alongside our formula. This means our formula is fully accredited for, and the chemicals used aren’t as harmful as the low quality ethanol solutions which do not need to pass any authentication checks. Don’t take any risks with your skin, and purchase a product that is guaranteed to be kind on your skin.